Living afloat
The story of the Luxe Motor Watergeus, the Groningse snik Hornblower, the klipperaak Aquarel, the lemmeraak 'Op Hoop van Zegen' and how to convert a Dutch barge into a houseboat.
 
MS Watergeus
Watergeus
The Watergeus is my home. It's an old Dutch Luxe Motor, built in 1929. She was about to be scrapped when we bought her...
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Living Afloat gives you free ideas on what you need to know about barges, how to buy them, how to convert them, etc..
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The Aquarel is an authentic klipperaak from 1916 converted for exhibitions and with a permanent small museum of maritime artifacts.
 
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The 'Op Hoop van Zegen' is a lemmeraak from 1916. She is being converted into a classic looking yacht.
 
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The Hornblower was a project of converting a snik into a yacht. I sold her in 2014 to start another project.
 
HomeConverting a barge • Building a waste water tank

Building a waste water tank

Waste water tanks are a hot item these days. They are becoming mandatory in barges, so you will need one, like it or not. Since I keep the water system aboard as simple as possible, I decided to build one my own (and the help of some friends).

It is not necessary to build one. There are many professional tanks for sale, you can even make them the size you want. Some people prefer to have two waste tanks, a brown and black one. Gray is for shower and kitchen water, the black one for the toilet. You can then choose to reuse the gray water tank for flushing the toilet and so ending in the black water tank.

What size do you need?

Depending on whether you want to empty the tank regularly and the amount of people living aboard you can make up the size you need. The bigger the tank make sure it is baffled.

What should it be made off?

It is better to build a tank in stainless steel or thick plastic. Metal is fine as well, as long as you protect the inside with cement or good quality paint.

Building the tank aboard the Watergeus

The tank is being built at this moment. Pictures and more information will follow soon!

 
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Last updated on: Tuesday, 20 September, 2016 11:00 PM
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