Living afloat
The story of the Luxe Motor Watergeus, the Groningse snik Hornblower, the klipperaak Aquarel, the lemmeraak 'Op Hoop van Zegen' and how to convert a Dutch barge into a houseboat.
 
MS Watergeus
Watergeus
The Watergeus is my home. It's an old Dutch Luxe Motor, built in 1929. She was about to be scrapped when we bought her...
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(and old stuff - outdated)
Living Afloat
Living Afloat gives you free ideas on what you need to know about barges, how to buy them, how to convert them, etc..
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MS Aquarel
The Aquarel is an authentic klipperaak from 1916 converted for exhibitions and with a permanent small museum of maritime artifacts.
 
MY Op Hoop van Zegen
Op Hoop van Zegen
The 'Op Hoop van Zegen' is a lemmeraak from 1916. She is being converted into a classic looking yacht.
 
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I spent most of my time in or around boats. Read what I'm doing!
MS Hornblower
The Hornblower was a project of converting a snik into a yacht. I sold her in 2014 to start another project.
 
HomeLiving Afloat • Barges & their wheelhouse

Wheelhouses on barges

Wheelhouses used to be built in wood and were removable for passing some lower bridges. These days they are built in aluminium and can be raised or lowered by a hydraulic system. It is the area where the skipper spent most of his time.

Outside pictures

General pictures


Wheelhouse of a Steilsteven


Simple and clean wheelhouse on a Katwijker


Raised wheelhouse on a converted clipper


A neglected wheelhouse on a Belgian aak


Wheelhouse on a Kempenaar built in the 70's


The letter 'C' of a Cummings engine aboard the Sarca


A common view on barges, life rings in front of the wheelhouse


A common view on barges, life rings in front of the wheelhouse


A common view on barges, life rings in front of the wheelhouse


Outside electricity and controls are nicely integrated in wheelhouse


Narrow wheelhouse on a Kempenaar. Wheelhouse can be raised or lowered.


Wheelhouse can be reached by stairs. Barge has sadly been scrapped. Nice painting on the front of the wheelhouse .


Nice painting on the front of the wheelhouse


Wheelhouse roof extended


Curtains in a wheelhouse is a typical sign of a house boat


A wheelhouse of a Kastje, been used as a house boat, but still looking like on a commercial barge.


An original looking wheelhouse on a Luxe Motor in London. Only the blue board needs repainting.


A top heavy construction, but offering a lot of space on top of the original accommodation


I haven't seen two of these wheelhouses around. Build in a L-shape.

Blinded windows

In the early days many windows in a wheelhouse were blinded or it was just a wooden panel instead of glass. This was for two reasons:

  • Windows could break when lowering the wheelhouse
  • Some skippers were afraid their vanished interior would be lighter because of sun light coming in.

 

Inside pictures


Traditional looking wheelhouse, wheel has been taken off (Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


Expensive traditional wheel (Photo; Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


A simple looking wheelhouse on barge. (Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


A rather typical wheelhouse for a house boat (Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


(Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


(Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


And how it should not be done (Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


(Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)


(Photo: Scheepsmakelaar Fikkers)

A kitchen in a wheelhouse

In Amsterdam, while walking around, I discovered a kitchen made in the wheelhouse:

 
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Last updated on: Tuesday, 20 September, 2016 11:00 PM
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