Living afloat
The story of the Luxe Motor Watergeus, the Groningse snik Hornblower, the klipperaak Aquarel, the lemmeraak 'Op Hoop van Zegen', the Friese maatkast Tordino and how to convert a Dutch barge into a houseboat.
 
MS Watergeus
Watergeus
The Watergeus is my home. It's an old Dutch Luxe Motor, built in 1929. She was about to be scrapped when we bought her...
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(and old stuff - outdated)
Living Afloat
Living Afloat gives you free ideas on what you need to know about barges, how to buy them, how to convert them, etc..
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MS Tordino
The Tordino is a Friese Maatkast built in 1922. She is being converted into a floating museum.
 
MS Aquarel
The Aquarel is an authentic klipperaak from 1916 converted for exhibitions and with a permanent small museum of maritime artifacts. She was sold in 2016 and is now a houseboat in Zaandam.
 
MY Op Hoop van Zegen
Op Hoop van Zegen
The 'Op Hoop van Zegen' is a lemmeraak from 1916. She was converted into a classic looking yacht.
 
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I spent most of my time in or around boats. Read what I'm doing!
MS Hornblower
The Hornblower was a project of converting a snik into a yacht. I sold her in 2014 to start another project.
 
HomeConversion • January 2006

January 2006

7th January 2006

Andy made his payment to the yard, so officially the boat became his today. It was a cold day, where I also nearly slipped in the water because of the frozen smog on deck. The first thing he did was hanging the British flag and getting something to eat. With no furniture, we sat on the ground in the back accommodation. I started reading the documents that were left around, such as the River Rhine Certificate, Oil delivery books, some logs, etc... I promised him to do an effort in tracking the history of the boat.

The pictures here show in what state the vessel was. She had no roof over her cargo hold. The engine room had flooded and the water was starting to fill the cargo hold as well.


Wheelhouse and tabernakels


Water in the cargo hold

14th & 15th January 2006

We placed a generator aboard for making use of the tools and a gas bottle for the heating.

We decided to start cleaning the cargo hold. Removing leaves, water and rubbish from the bilges. In one day time, most of it was cleaned and with the wooden planks a floor was created. We hadn't enough for creating the whole floor. A few were missing, but the result looked satisfied.

 

The next day, the wooden floor was cleaned with a high pressure machine.


A clean floor, only one day later

28th & 29th January 2006

In the last week, Andy had cleaned the engine room and repaired the central heating; an essential part for the next couple of months!


Repairing the engine

Some paintwork was done, this to protect the weakest places on the back cabin. The engine was started for the first time and ran for nearly one hour, propeller turning. No smoke came out of the funnel, a good sign!

Propellor turning
Propeller turning

We also discussed the option of shortening the boat. It is not an idea, I would like to support, but this ship has a better value in Great Britain, when she's shorter. We took a look at the dry-dock facility in Terneuzen and talked with the man of the yard.

30th January 2006

Back in Ostend, I sent an e-mail to the shipyard in Terneuzen about shortening the boat and arranging a meeting to talk in detail about this project.

 
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Last updated on: Tuesday, 7 March, 2017 11:01 PM
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