Wheelhouses on barges

Wheelhouses used to be built in wood and were removable for passing under some lower bridges. These days they are built in aluminum and can be raised or lowered by a hydraulic system. A wheelhouse is very often the area where the skipper spent most of his time.

Outside pictures

Blended windows

In the early days many windows in a wheelhouse were blended or it was just a wooden panel instead of glass. This was for two reasons:

  • Windows could break when lowering the wheelhouse
  • Some skippers were afraid their vanished interior would be deteriorating quicker because of sun light coming in.

Nowadays this is no longer allowed since you must have an all-round view from the wheelhouse. This is also one of the rules in getting a CVO.

Inside pictures

Some inside pictures of the wheelhouses from Dutch Barges. Most of the pictures were used with permission from the broker website Fikkers.

A kitchen in a wheelhouse

While walking around in Amsterdam, I discovered that several people had their kitchen made in the wheelhouse. It is not such a crazy idea after all. If you don’t move your boat, the wheelhouse is a perfect place to see what is happening and what is nicer then cooking with a good view?

The old articles on converting a barge…

29th October 2019 – During the upgrade of the website, the old articles on converting a barge were removed. Many people asked me to put them back online. I’ve just created a new category in this website ‘converting a barge’. There you will find the articles from the early days of Living Afloat, when it all started in 2005.

When I publish the articles, I will try to update them.

 

Have Fun!

Tordino – Upgrading the back accommodation – Part 1

12th October 2019 – We started with the back accommodation. The cupboards in the bedroom downstairs were falling apart and several shelves were missing. I rebuilt them and gave a good coat of primer at the end of the evening.

Old tape was removed from the good shelves. The stairs were covered by old carpet. The freezer who had not been used for at least three years was also thrown away. New wires were put behind the walls with proper sockets and switches.

Water-rAnt – Day 1

27th September 2019 – We arrived a little early on the event and decided to build the tent ourselves. It worked and we were the first who were fully active.

It became windy and it started raining a t 5 o’clock. We closed our tent and had a look on the event. The ships arrived and I took some pictures and made some movies.

 

Tordino – Cleaning the engine room of the bowthruster

21st September 2019 – One of the dirtiest places aboard Tordino is the front engine room. I cleaned it out at the yard when they had to do some welding. After the issue of leakage at the yard, it was pumped with water to find the leak. Once empty it remained dirty.  I had an old barrel with oil from the bilges aboard, old dirty tools and stuff from previous owners. It all had to go!

Half of the engine floor was still on deck from last year.

Tordino – Unloading some stuff

17th September 2019 – I unloaded the stuff I got from the Festina Lente. At some point I had to call a friend. The chimney was to heavy and it got stuck on a few wooden planks.

While waiting for him to arrived, I greased the lorry for the hatches.

 

Watergeus – Painting

15th September 2019 – The den and front cabin got a second coat of paint. I put some order on my deck and put the propellers back on the roof of the bathroom. One of them was slightly to heavy and I had to use my crane. Never underestimate the luxury of having a crane aboard your ship!

On starboard side, I removed a metal strip so the water could easier get of the ship. I did the same thing on port side last year.

The little boat on my deck was cleaned and I moved some old plates and put them under the hatches. All small things that make my ship looking better again.

Tordino – Open Monumentendag

8th September 2019 – There were 198 visitors on the event Open Monumentendag aboard Tordino. A good result.  The people who came were really interested, asked questions and told their own stories. At the end of the evening, I was exhausted and happy to close the hatches….